Time Alone: Seven Benefits of Voluntary Solitude

January 4th, 2017   •   no comments   
Time Alone: Seven Benefits of Voluntary Solitude

Many people feel uncomfortable spending more than a few hours alone, yet voluntary solitude, if used gainfully, can improve mental health, reduce stress, and assist personal growth. Here are seven ways to benefit from spending time alone.

 

1) You can escape the relentless immediacy of modern life

Today’s always switched-on world is a stressful place, and it’s easy to become a slave to your communications devices and the TV. While on retreat, you can avoid the demands of email, phone calls, text messages, and advertisements. Reclaim your power of concentration and use it to focus on one of the activities suggested in this article.

 

2) There’s an opportunity to indulge in self-discovery

In these hurried times, you’re likely to spend much of your day on autopilot, doing what’s necessary to get through, without questioning whether there’s a better way to live. Time alone provides an opportunity to slow down and reflect on whether your life choices truly reflect who you are and what you want. There’ll be time to make plans for change, too.

 

3) You’ll have time to nurture your creativity

Use your distraction-free time to start new hobbies or revisit old ones. Write, paint, tend your garden, sing, or dance. Express yourself without having to worry what others will think. Engage in activities that feed your soul; however, there’s nothing wrong with doing little but thinking–it’s what you think about that’s important.

 

4) You can take a short break from your responsibilities

You must take responsibilities seriously, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take a holiday from them occasionally. A period of solitude allows you to replenish your energy levels, so you can go back to your duties and obligations feeling refreshed.

 

5) There’s a chance to kick-start that healthier lifestyle you’ve been promising yourself

Away from your daily routine, it’s easier to begin living a healthy lifestyle. If you usually rely on convenience foods, try preparing your meals from scratch using fresh ingredients. Forgo alcohol and cigarettes. Cut down on your coffee intake. Catch up on sleep. If you lead a sedentary life, take some exercise. You don’t have to stay at home to be alone–take a solitary walk or run. Find a place where the air is clean and the view, inspiring. Keep it up when you go back to your usual routine.

 

6) You can evaluate your relationships

Often you don’t realize how much some people drain your energy, and how much others give you a boost, until you stop seeing them for a while. Use your time away from friends and family to appraise your relationships. Who energizes and inspire you? Are you guilty of neglecting important relationships? Are there any drama-ridden, unhealthy relationships you should end?

 

7) You’ll develop a useful skill for dealing with life

Given that you’re likely to have to spend more than a few hours alone at various times during your lifetime, the art of contented solitude is a useful skill to master. For instance, you might move away from friends and family to attend college or start a new job. How would you feel about the initial lack of close company? Spending some planned time alone will help you to become more self-reliant and confident that periods of solitude, whether voluntary or non-voluntary, can be used positively and healthfully.

 

Even if you can only manage a few hours, seek solitude occasionally, use it well and become healthier, calmer, and more self-reliant.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Download Your Free Stress Management Workbook Now!

Get our free Stress Management Workbook to help you identify and track your stress, and provide you with a variety of proven techniques that you can use to counteract stress. It helps you:

  • Set stress management goals
  • Identify your stressors
  • Learn 5 key steps to managing your stress
  • and more!
Close this popup